Are Blinds Included When You Buy a Home?

Abigail Sawyer | 27 Feb 2019 | Blinds

If you’re buying or selling a house, you may be wondering whether blinds are considered personal property, or if they’re included in the house sale.

Are Blinds Considered a Fixture When Selling a House?

Regulations vary by state, but generally anything that’s permanently affixed to the house with nails, glue, cement, pipes or screws it is considered part of the house and “conveys” with the sale. This includes blinds, plantation shutters, and shades, which are screwed into the window frame.

The only exception to this is when an item has been outlined in the seller property disclosure that it does not convey. Be sure to clearly define what “window treatments” you’re referring to in the disclosure, including blinds, shades, curtains, and even curtain rods. Read on for more details about curtains.

Woman hanging black metal curtain rod

Are Curtains and Curtain Rods Included in the Sale of a House?

Curtains are a bit of a grey area when it comes to buying a house, so it’s always best to ask for clarification. Traditionally, curtain rods are considered fixtures because they are anchored to the wall. However, the curtains themselves are usually seen as personal property because they can be slid off the rod. Some buyers assume that custom drapes are included in the sale because they were made for the room, but this is not always the case.

Be sure to verify whether curtains and rods are included in the sale and record any answers in writing as part of your contract. It’s always safer to over-communicate early and avoid conflict over small details when negotiations are underway.

white blinds hanging over window in room with grey abstract striped wallpaper

How to Negotiate Window Treatments into the Sale or Purchase of a House

If You’re Selling:

If you want to take your window treatments with you when you move, the best course of action is to remove them and/or replace them with a cheaper version before you list your house. If you’re not able to do this, be sure to clearly outline what stays and what goes in the seller disclosure and all marketing materials. This way, buyers will be clear about what’s included when they make an offer.

If you decide you want to keep your treatments when you’re further along in the selling process, discuss your options with your realtor and the buyer. Some homeowners may want to buy their own window treatments. However, if they are interested in keeping the existing window treatments, you may have to leave them behind or negotiate this into your sale. Whatever you work out, be sure to get it in writing as part of your contract.

The worst thing you can do is take all the blinds when you move out and hope the buyer doesn’t notice. Swapping them for a cheaper version secretly isn’t a good idea either. You may be forced to bring the blinds back or give the buyer a credit for their value. All of this could lead to the sale falling through or a case in small claims court.

Arched window with white blinds and beige curtains

Before you fight tooth and nail for your window treatments, be aware that there’s no “standard window size,” and your current blinds probably won’t fit the windows in your new home. You won’t exactly be giving off a polished look with windows that aren’t fully covered or blinds that are too short. It’s often better to start fresh and give your windows a new look.

One exception to making window treatments fit different windows is curtains, which can sometimes be hemmed or hung at a different height. Just be sure to notify the buyer that you’re taking the curtains with you. See our section on curtains above for more details.

If you need help getting started with new window coverings – take our BlindFinder quiz or talk to a Blinds.com Designer. If your home improvement to-do list is already a mile long, simplify the process with a professional install.

modern living room with yellow accessories, yellow patterned roman shades and cream curtains on top.

If You’re Buying:

If you want to make sure that window treatments are included in your home purchase, look over your contract to see if they’re specifically mentioned. If not, have your realtor ask the seller and update the contract in writing. Everything is negotiable, but it’s best to start these discussions early so they don’t hinder the sale.

Before you negotiate to keep window treatments, especially curtains, be sure that they match the furniture you’ll be using in that room. You don’t want to fight for something and find out later that it doesn’t work.

If you end up without any window treatments, it’s not the end of the world. This gives you an opportunity to customize your windows to your style, rather than settling for what was already there.

If you need help getting started, try taking our BlindFinder quiz or speaking to a Blinds.com Designer. If your home improvement to-do list is already a mile long, simplify the process with a professional install.

  • About Author

    Abigail Sawyer is a Senior Social Media Specialist for Blinds.com. She's a home improvement junkie who is currently restoring a 1972 cottage with the help of her husband and goldendoodle, Biscuit. Walking in the footsteps of Martha Stewart, she’s happiest when she’s crafting or whipping up a new recipe; although nothing beats curling up with a good book and some Girl Scout Cookies. Follow her on twitter + instagram at @whatabigailsaw